Training Opportunities / FAQ's


Training Opportunities
2016 - 2017 Schedule

Orientation Dates:

December 1st      5:30-7:00 pm,     150 Boulevard, Ste 3, Washington

 December 5th      5:30-7:00 pm,     150 Boulevard, Ste 3, Washington

 December 13th   12:00-1:30 pm,     150 Boulevard, Ste 3, Washington

 January 18th       5:30-7:00 pm,      150 Boulevard, Ste 3, Washington

 January 19th      12:00-1:30 pm,      150 Boulevard, Ste 3, Washington



Conference room
 December 14th   12:00-1:30 pm,    120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater
 
 January 11th        5:30-7:00 pm,     120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater

 January 12th        5:30-7:00 pm,     120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater


2017 Spring Training Dates:

Times:          5:30pm to 8:30pm
Exceptions:  9:00am to 3:00pm on 2/18, 3/4 and 3/18

February:
February 7th      PeopleCare Center,    120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater
February 18th    CASA SHaW office,   150 Boulevard, Ste 3,  Washington
February 21st     PeopleCare Center,    120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater
February 28th    PeopleCare Center,    120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater 

March:
March 4th          CASA SHaW office,   150 Boulevard, Ste 3,  Washington
March 7th          PeopleCare Center,    120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater 
March 14th        PeopleCare Center,    120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater 
March 18th        CASA SHaW office,   150 Boulevard, Ste 3,  Washington
March 21st         PeopleCare Center,    120 Finderne Avenue, Bridgewater 

TBD – Court Observation and Swearing-In

To register, phone 908-689-5515 or email info@casashaw.org 

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Condensed Training Option:
If the February/March dates do not workfor you, we have a new condensed training option.. The dates are Monday June 5 through Saturday June 10 from 9 am to 3 pm.

Location is 33 Rupell Road, Hampton, NJ. This location is right off of Route 78.

If interested, please contact CASA's Volunteer Trainer Eva Uhrik at eva@casashaw.org to begin the application process.. 
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We are very grateful to the Allergan Foundation for its support of our continuing education and inservice initiative for current and prospective volunteer advocates.

Have you heard about the Traveling Tutor initiative? Here's some information which you might useful.


FAQ's

What Does a CASA Volunteer Do?
Advocating for the best interest of the child, a trained CASA provides a judge with carefully researched details about the child to help the court make a sound decision about that child’s future. He or she recommends to the judge what the child needs to be safe and what is in the best interest for a permanent home. The CASA makes recommendations to the judge in the form of a report, attends the child’s hearings and follows through on the case until it is permanently resolved.

What Training Does a CASA Volunteer Receive?
CASA volunteer advocates receive 30 hours of classroom instruction from the program staff, and other professionals in our community. After the classroom instruction is complete the volunteer is sworn in by the family court Judge and then concludes the training with a 3-hour courtroom observation that is required before CASA volunteers can take a case. Thereafter, volunteers are required to fulfill 12 hours of in-service training per year.

How Much Time Does It Require?
Each case is different. A CASA volunteer usually spends about 15 hours a month doing research and conducting interviews prior to the first court appearance. More complicated cases take longer. Once initiated into the system, volunteer advocates work anywhere from 4-20 hours per month depending on the complexity of the case to which they are assigned.


FAQ's (continued)


How Much Time Does It Require?
Each case is different. A CASA volunteer usually spends about 15 hours a month doing research and conducting interviews prior to the first court appearance. More complicated cases take longer. Once initiated into the system, volunteer advocates work anywhere from 4-20 hours per month depending on the complexity of the case to which they are assigned.

How Is CASA Different From The Division Of Youth And Family Services (DYFS)? 
Case workers generally are employed by state governments. They sometimes work on over 20 cases at a time while CASA volunteers are able to provide their full attention to just one family at a time. No state agency could ever afford to provide the kind of one-on-one assistance that CASA makes available to the children and families. The CASA volunteer does not replace the case worker; he or she is an independent appointee of the court. The CASA volunteer can thoroughly examine a child’s case, has knowledge of the community resource, and can make a recommendation to the court independent of the state agency restrictions.

How Long Does a CASA Volunteer Remain Involved with a Case?
Our CASA program requires a minimum one-year commitment with the ultimate goal of the volunteer continuing until the case is permanently resolved and permanency has been achieved. That is because one of the primary benefits of the CASA program is that, unlike other court principals who often rotate cases, the CASA volunteer is a consistent figure in the proceedings and provides continuity for a child.

How Attached Does a CASA Become to the Child(ren)?
CASAs do not have a close relationship with the child the way a Big Brother or Big Sister would. As an advocate, you see the child approximately once a month. The CASA role is to facilitate services for the child, not to have the child or the family becomes dependent upon them. 

Do CASAs Go Into the Homes of the Birth Parents Whose Children Have Been Removed?
CASAs meet birth parents both in their homes and in neutral places such as diners, fast food restaurants, the place they may go for therapy or visits with their child, or outside the courtroom. The safety of the volunteer is very important to us, and we would never ask a volunteer to go someplace where they did not feel safe. If the child is going to be reunited with the parent(s), the CASA often goes to visit where they live shortly before this takes place as part of their independent assessment of the situation.

Is There a "Typical” CASA Advocate?
CASA volunteers come from all walks of life with a variety of professional, educational and ethnic backgrounds. In FY09, there were more than 1,237 CASA volunteers assigned to cases statewide.

How Are CASA Programs Funded?
CASA programs depend on their communities to support the service. Foundations, corporations, fundraising events, annual giving and grants are just some examples of the ongoing support recieved by local CASA programs.

How Effective Have CASA Programs Been?
Research suggests that children who have been assigned CASA volunteers tend to spend less time within the foster care system than those who do not have a CASA volunteer - an average of eight months shorter. They also do better in school overall, have fewer placement changes, and have more services ordered for them. Children assigned to a CASA also have better chances of finding permanent homes than children not assigned to a CASA, with significantly lower rates of re-entry than children without an advocate.
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